How could Parkhomov's 225 day reactor get started?

... and keep running even after the Nickel had melted?

At ICCF-22, I was asked by Jean-Paul Biberian, editor in chief of The Journal of Condensed Matter Nuclear Science, how Dr. Alexander Parkhomov’s 225 day reactor worked long after its Nickel melted. I had clear idea in my head, which would also explain the observations at the end of the experiment. I will go over what that was today and it has broad ranging implications to a range of LENR systems.

You can hear the Q&A using the link below. Slides can be found here.

Reactions discussed during the live stream

Before the 225 day reactor was run, the core was found to be around 1% calcium, after the experiment, it was found to be around 20%.

The inner reactor core was made of Silicon Carbide. Using the MFMP fusion reaction calculator and the following query (without neutrinos involved)

E1 in ('C') and E2 in ('Si' ) order by MeV desc

we get,

The heater coil was a tungsten wire (in hydrogen atmosphere). Using the MFMP fission reaction calculator, and the following query (without neutrinos involved)

E = 'W' order by MeV desc

we get,

Kinetic energy released during fission of tungsten isotopes. 180W is a rare isotope (0.14%), 182 and 184W together are over 57% of W and preferentially would yield W.

REFERENCES

ECTON PROCESSES AT THE CATHODE IN A VACUUM DISCHARGE - G.A. Mesyats, 1996

INITIATION of EXPLOSIVE ELECTRON EMISSION PULSES – ECTONS as INITIATION of VACUUM DISCHARGE STAGES – the BREAKDOWN, the SPARK, and the ARC

Atomistic Mechanisms of rf Breakdown in high-gradient linacs

Ed Lewis presentation showing transmutation and morphological changes by John Dash in LENR sample over time.